Thursday, March 22, 2007

A dream that carried on...

I published this before (2 years ago) in the school newspaper
The Ottoman Empire had collapsed more than a decade earlier, World War II would soon begin, British prime minister had promised the Jews a “homeland” in Palestine ... The situation was depressing, and the future seemed bleak. Yet for one Palestinian family in Gaza, the situation was not so grim. Ismail had a glimmering of hope with the birth of his son Ahmed. For Ismail, Ahmed was more than just a son; he embodied a dream of independence and a source of pride. Ismail taught him to love his country with all his heart and defend it until his last breath and drop of blood. Ahmed was very much inspired by his father's teachings. He hung the Palestinian flag in his room, and he prayed every day that God would give him a chance to do something for his country. A few years later, as Ahmed about to become a teen-ager, the state of Israel was declared by the United Nations, making his dream appear futile. A few months later Ahmed had an accident that paralyzed his hands and legs; with this, another of his dreams seemed dashed. However, Ahmed was not yet willing to give up the dream of living in a free and liberated Palestine. He was not willing to give up his dream of living an honorable life, defending his country and his beliefs, and dying as a martyr. "If I have lost my hands and legs, I still have my brain, my tongue, my eyes and my ears," he thought. He decided to take full advantage of everything God had granted him, having full faith that God would never turn him down if he did his best. He then started his struggle against the occupation. Being physically handicapped did not prevent him from moving all around his country, city to city and village to village, to explain the consequences of the occupation and to inspire his people to resist. He was detained, once and twice and three times, but he never gave up his dream to live and die serving his country. Ahmed, now Sheikh Ahmed, grew older and finished his religious studies at Al-Azhar University, not yet becoming a martyr. The dream now seemed unachievable. He was already more than 60 years old, his physical health was deteriorating, and he could barely leave his house. Yet even his statements inspired people; he had a clear vision and an important cause to defend. Israel could not bear the overwhelming strength of this handicap. A military operation was carried out and he was killed on his way back from morning prayers. Ahmed Ismail Yassin, or Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, was assassinated a year ago by the Israeli air forces, but his dream continues to exist.

2 comments:

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